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Q & A: Stevens Double Gun Patents

Q & A: Stevens Double Gun Patents/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d3de7bdd_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d3de7bdd_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Stevens No. 225 12 ga High hammers. 1904. Question: Stamped on the Stevens Model 355, and its successor Model 335 hammerless boxlock guns, I see the patent date Mar 19,1907. On the Stevens Model 330 and Riverside No. 315 and Springfield No. 311, which are also boxlock hammerless models, I see stamped the words Patented April 20, 1915. On some Stevens' Riverside No. 215 hammer doubles is stamped  Patented  Feb 10,1914 . Were these Patents owned by Stevens? What features do these patents protect. and when were these patent dates stamped on the guns? Knowing this would help me to identify models and estimate their dates of manufacture. As you know, because no Savage ( including Savage/Stevens/Fox/ Baker/Davis/Crescent)  factory production records have survived, getting a sure fix on Stevens doubles' models and dates can be difficult. Did these patents issue on the dates noted or did they take effect when the patents were ‘applied for'? Did they expire after 17 years? Hope this is within your realm of expertise. Thank you. FS Answer: Related GunDigest Articles Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Gun Review: Stevens S1200 Shotgun Photo Gallery: 14 Amazing Engraved Guns of Gun Digest 2015 Interesting question! I have researched this and can try to offer you some information on patents used by Stevens. Remember, the patents were good, unless invalidated, for 17 years after being granted. Sometimes the patent application process was ‘dragged out' to keep the patented invention under control of the owner for a longer period. Dates and brief descriptions of the three Stevens patents you mention in your letter follow. These were very important patents to Stevens!: March 19,1907  = #847,659 Ed Elder to J Stevens A&T Co. cocking lever trigger plate on hammerless boxlocks 1907-1914   Stevens (335, 365), also “Pat appl'd for” 2 years previous to 1907. February 10,1914 = # 1,086,378  George S Lewis to J Stevens A&T Co. plunger strikers (firing pins) with coil springs and pivoted triggers on hammer boxlocks, 1914 -1928  and “Pat appl'd for” two years previous to 1914. Models Stevens (225), Riverside (215). April 20,1915 = #1,136,247 George S Lewis to J Stevens A&T Co. one piece cast frame, combination cocking lever and extractor on hammerless boxlocks 1915-1932, doubles stamped “Pat appl'd for” and ‘patent pending' several years before 1915: Models marked: Riverside (311,315) Springfield (311,315), Stevens, Eastern Arms , Central Arms, many other private brands.

AR-15 Review: Del-Ton Tapco

AR-15 Review: Del-Ton Tapco

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f37645e8f68d_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f37645e8f68d_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } A reliable rifle, but one thing I’d have to change is the SAW-shape grip. As you can see, the extra length and swell doesn’t do anything for my grip. Del-Ton makes good rifles, even though some shooters are so class-based they won’t acknowledge any rifle not made by the “best” or “mil-spec” companies. Their loss, says Patrick Sweeney in this AR-15 review. There are those who spend an inordinate amount of time producing lists that rank items. The top ten this, the bottom ten that, the “good” the “bad” and the “ugly.” Okay, that last one is a movie, but even movies get ranked. In the AR-verse, those who rank go to a lot of trouble to rank rifles and producers. Woe to the manufacturer who does not make the top of such lists. Combining with Tapco, Del-Ton offers a nicely-spec’d rifle that is a good starting point. Or just a good rifle, period. Well, there are makers of ARs you should avoid. But a lot of the talk is based on assumptions, small sample sizes and just plain “I had a bad rifle, so they are all bad” reasoning. I’ve wanted to investigate the Del-Ton rifle line, but I never managed to get around to it, until now. And in case you haven’t made the connection, Del-Ton is one of the companies that some list makers love to hate. The Del-Ton carbine sent to me is a collaboration between Del-Ton and Tapco. Located in Elizabethtown, North Carolina, Del-Ton offers a huge array of rifles and carbines, as well as parts for them, accessories and all the mouth-watering goodies you could ever wish to bolt to your AR. Many of the items they list are made by manufacturers who are on the tops of lists of “good” ARs, so it is kind of hard to square that with “Del-Ton isn’t good” venom. Tapco comes in for its share (fair or not) of dislike, and again, I can’t see it. Sure, they may use different polymers, formulations that won’t stand up well to NATO-spec chemical, biological and radiation warfare decontamination. Do you really need that? And if you do, let me know where you live, so I can stay the heck away. Marked with the Del-Ton logo, a stylized DTI, and with the flat-top rail slots numbered and filled, the carbine is smoothly finished and deep black. No purple or gray here. Related GunDigest Articles AR-15 Review: Get Tactical in 2015 AR-15 Review: Colt Expanse M4 Gallery: AR Sights and Lights The rifle itself is your basic stoner-style carbine, direct gas impingement with a 16” barrel complete with M4/203 barrel cut, and a fixed front sight base. The important parts are all in the details. Not that the details themselves are always critical, but attention to detail tells us a lot about those who make an item. The front sight is fixed, but it is “F” marked and the correct height for an M4 carbine. While the rifle as-sent did not come with a rear sight, any you would wish to bolt to it will line up correctly with the front sight. Some makers overlook this and ship a flat-top upper with a non-F height front sight, presenting problems in getting the thing to sight in. Not so with Del-Ton. Del-Ton makes good rifles, even though some shooters are so class-based they won’t acknowledge any rifle not made by the “best” or “mil-spec” companies. Their loss. It is also held on with taper pins, another good sign. The barrel has a 1/9 twist, which isn’t mil-spec, but common, and has a 5.56 chamber. And yes, that is a detail that is critical, as I mentioned in the chapter on the differences between this and the .223. I used my Michigun chamber gauge to check, and while I can feel a little bit of rubbing at the rifling leade, the neck and throat are 5.56 length and diameter. Well done, Del-Ton. The stock is standard M4, but with a twist: it is sand/desert color (aka flat dark earth), made by Tapco and so-marked. (And just as a small departure from my usual dispassionate, reasoned and detached observation, who the heck named this? I mean, “dark” earth? Where would this color be dark? Some place with white sand beaches? Okay then, in the Caribbean it is dark. The rest of the world calls it tan, beige, sand or worse.) The stock slides on a commercial-diameter buffer tube, while inside of it is an “H” buffer. While military-diameter buffer tubes are theoretically better, I’ve given up caring about which is which. Does it fit? Yes, this one does fit well. Then we’re fine. The buffer tube castle nut is staked, heavily, and in two places. Inside, the hammer is a modified (the top, autosear lug is ground off) M16 hammer, the carrier is a shrouded (M16) carrier with the auto-sear shoulder ground back. The trigger pull is proper mil-spec, in that you can feel the over-travel when you dry-fire, but when shooting you don’t. The Tapco handguard offers rail estate, albeit a bit portly for my tastes. But some of the shooters who tried it loved it, so it simply proves you should try things for yourself. The carrier key is properly (read: heavily) staked, and the interior of the gas tube and the carrier are both properly hard-chromed. While the carrier and bolt are not marked as to the manufacturer, they have the typical machining marks that you’d see on carriers by any of the top-quality makers. That is, none, as the surface is properly bead-blasted before being parkerized. Obvious care has gone into these parts. If Del-Ton doesn’t make them themselves, they take care in obtaining them from someone who knows how to tend to details. The extractor spring is correctly installed and has the black insert in it. The feed ramps are M4, lowered down into the receiver cross-section ramps, and the machining was done before the upper was anodized. The handguard is the Tapco Intrafuse handguard. It is a rigid but not free-float handguard, with a rail the full length on top and bottom, and half-length side rails. The bottom and side rails have covers, while the top rail is left alone. You can leave it as-is, or take the cover or covers off and mount gear there. With the covers on, the handguard is a bit portly. But some like that, and if you find it is just a bit biggish, you can take the covers off. Me, I like to run handguards as small and trim as I can, so leaving them off would be my choice.

How to Choose A Rifle Scope for Long Range Shooting

How to Choose A Rifle Scope for Long Range Shooting

In this article, we will analyze all the other features that differentiate the many scopes on the market and that must be considered when choosing the best optic for your needs. Fixed or variable: Fixed scopes are of less complex construction. Simple construction equals more reliability, and that’s the reason why the military have used fixed scopes for decades. Modern construction process have increased reliability of variable optics however, when you are on a budget, you may consider to get a fixed scope since they are cheaper respect of their variable counterpart of similar quality. On the other hand, variable scopes allow you to fit a wide range of “jobs”, since you may need to change magnification for various reasons, such avoid mirage distortion, increase field of view, increase light transmission for twilight (not the movie) shots, or decrease wobbling perception during off hand or unsupported shooting. Magnification: The amount of magnification we are going to need is in function of the type of shooting, the distance, and the target size. Longer distances and smaller targets require more magnification. More is not always better, since with higher magnifications you amplify optical imperfections in mid and low priced scopes, sometimes compromising your ability to aim accurately, thus the higher the magnification, the better must be the optic. Moreover, optics with more magnifications are also generally more bulky and heavier. From my experience, for target shooting at static distances (i.e. 1000y matches), varmint hunting, and extreme long range shooting, 20-25X scopes works just fine. For military style shooting, at paper targets or gongs at variable distances, or for big game hunting at long (but not extreme) range, 12-14X are more than enough. Front lens (or objective) diameter: Larger front lenses allow more light in the scope, meaning that we should be able to shoot under lower light conditions. I’ve written “we should” because in reality light transmission is also in function of other variables like the light transmission capability of the lens crystal and the scope’s tube diameter. We can obtain a reference value of the low light capability of a scope, the so-called “exit pupil”, dividing the front lens diameter (in millimetres) by the magnification value. For example,if we have a 10×40 scope we will have an exit pupil of 40/10=4mm. Here again, more is not always better. Our pupil can receive only a certain amount of light, and that amount of light decreases with age. In addition, high exit pupil values are useful for shots in low light conditions, but when you are utilizing the scope in standard light conditions (i.e. in the middle of the day), the great amount of light that you receive can prematurely strain your eye. Wider objectives also force you to mount the scope higher over the barrel line, forcing you to stay higher with your head and increasing the errors due to rifle canting. From my experience, for hunting purpose, where you are likely to shot in low light cnditions,  a good 50mm is enough. For target shooting, a 50mm is still good but even a 40mm will do the job. Field of view: also indicated with the acronym FOV, is the amount of view that you can see through your scope at a given distance. It is indicated in ft@100yds (feet at 100yds) or m@100m (meters at 100m). The amount of FOV of a scope is determined by the internal construction of the eyepiece. It is an important parameter to consider when choosing a scope for hunting or dynamic shooting purpose, since a wider field of view may help in tracking a moving target as well as spotting multiple targets in the same area and eventually following their movements. Tube diameter: The scope’s tube is the cylindrical part of the scope between the eyepiece and the turret and between the turrets and the objective cone. Its diameter is indicated in millimeters (the diameter of 25mm is indicated as 1”), and it is a crucial parameter for the selection of a scope. Wider tubes allow more light transmission and, generally, a higher amount of adjustment. In the past, almost all the rifle scopes on the market came with a 25mm (or 1”) tube. Today, many brands offer 30mm tubes with some offering 34mm and 40mm (like the IOR Valdada). Eye relief: When watching through a telescopic sight, there is only one distance, from the rear lens, from which the eye can see a full perfect picture. That distance is the eye relief. Its value is expressed in inches or millimeters, and for rifle scopes it is generally in the range of 3 to 4 in. Generally, it is related to the scope’s magnification, with higher magnifications scopes having shorter eye relief, but that’s not a rule. When choosing the scope, eye relief may be taken into consideration only when the scope is mounted on rifles with heavy recoil, since a short eye relief could be dangerous for the shooter. To be honest, a difference in eye relief of 1” is not that big difference. To avoid the famous “scope kiss”, a proper technique helps a lot more than that inch.

Dreams Of Being Shot and Other Things That Go Bump In The Night.

Dreams Of Being Shot and Other Things That Go Bump In The Night.

Does Anyone Else Have a Dream Of Being Shot Just having had the recurring dream I have about being shot I feel compelled to reach out and see if anyone else has these dreams. My dreams began about after a year of carrying concealed on a daily basis and has continued intermittently from that point forward. Actually I have two recurring dreams, one of them borne by a conscious fear I have, the other came out of nowhere to torture my sleeping hours. My first dream involves me being in a building that has some sort of covered patio area. I hear yelling and people screaming. One voice stands out, it is a voice with an accent to it. He is screaming at people to stand against a wall. I head towards the commotion down a hallway that opens onto the patio area. Hugging the wall I peer around the corner to see a crowd of people that are terrified huddling against the wall, faced by two men, both holding rifles. Both men are in street clothes, jeans and button down shirts. In a split second I decide to involve myself in the scenario, drawing my firearm, emerging from the hallway with it ready to fire. When I emerge one of the assailants has his rifle raised and is pointing at the people who are now screaming at a frenzied level. I shoot the man twice who has the rifle raised and shoot the man next to him just as he begins to raise his rifle. It is at the exact moment of shooting the second man that I see another bad guy out of my peripheral vision to my right who has his rifle shouldered, pointing at me. In a millisecond I realize I’m going to be dead because I screwed up and was too focused on the two guys in front of the crowd and never saw the third bad guy. I instantly wake up at this point, not knowing if I was shot in the face as it seemed was going to happen or not. After I have this dream I am left with a terrible feeling of dread. I train regularly, including formal training by some of the best in the industry, on not only handling a firearm, but also situational awareness. Look, assess, shoot, move, all the things one should do when confronted with in a situation such as this, but I missed the third guy. The easy lesson, “situational awareness” doesn’t seem to settle the adrenaline rush down each time I have the dream. I am at a loss why I have it over and over. I wonder if other people have dreams about getting shot in the face or just plain getting shot in a dream when they begin to exercise their CCW rights. As a side note, I am no stranger or newbie to handling firearms or even carrying them. I have trained with CCW firearms for decades, holding other states CCW licenses, carrying anytime I left my home state. That’s right, I could carry anywhere in the country except for the state I live in up until two years ago, so I don’t believe it’s “newbie jitters”. Second Frightening Dream Sequence My second dream is short as well. I stumble upon a man who has beaten a woman to the ground. Both he and she are colorless, non descript, there is no time to gain a description. He has her by the shirt in one hand and is pulling a large knife out of a belt holster as I walk up. I draw my weapon and yell, “Stop or I’ll shoot” at the top of my lungs. He glances at me and raises his hand to stab her. I pull the trigger twice and move to my left to assess the area and look to see if there is any other threat. After the sound of me screaming and the gun being discharged twice, people come running. I yell to the people to call 911 while keeping my firearm pointed at the perpetrator. Suddenly I hear a mans voice shout “he just shot that guy!” I look to my right, there is a group of about 6 people, I recognize that one of them is drawing a concealed firearm, he says nothing. I let go of my firearm with my right hand and hold my hand out, palm facing forward at the man drawing the gun and yell “I’m not the bad guy!” while holding my handgun in my left still pointed at the guy on the ground. As I look toward the bad guy and then back to the man who was drawing his gun, he has already brought the weapon to shooting level and is pointing directly at me. I yell again, “I am not the bad guy!” That is when I see the muzzle flash and smoke as he shoots me in the face. I think I understand what this dream is, my fear of being shot by some guy who walks up on a situation he doesn’t understand. He sees two people on the ground and one guy with a firearm. BOOM! He’s a hero right? It speaks to my fears that some people don’t take the responsibility of carrying a firearm as seriously as they should. That they don’t train day in and day out. That they don’t train with professional people who teach them situational awareness or situational assessment. They just pick up their firearm and walk out of the house. End of my life, end of their life, end of story. Two innocent people are gone, one to the grave, the other to prison. I wake up from this dream angry, not pumped with adrenaline like the first dream. I understand the anger, I also understand that there is nothing I can do about the type of person that shoots me in the face in the second scenario. It’s on them, not me. My dream has happened enough times that I searched the internet for the meaning of being shot in a dream, even searching specifically for being shot in the face in a dream. All of the so called explanations describe an ongoing conflict that is not in my control….do ya’ think!!!??? I don’t seem to have any day to day issues that fit the bill of this explanation, so I am at a loss. If you’ve had a similar dream or any dream that has to deal with being shot or even making a mistake when shooting we’d love to hear about them!

Concealed Carry Cover: Barranti Leather Swift Cover Vest

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cb3b8047_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cb3b8047_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Purpose built as a concealed carry overgarment, the Swift Cover Vest is a stylish and effective way to keep your gun under wraps. How The Swift Cover Vest Enhances Concealed Carry: Ruggedly made of cotton and canvas its made to last. Appropriate for all-seasons. Four exterior and two interior pockets ease carrying extra gear. Strategically placed weights aid in sweeping vest back on the draw. Long enough it provides excellent concealment when carrying OWB. The trick to carrying a concealed handgun is concealing it, but not to the point that you cannot access it easily and swiftly. Vests have been and continue to be a popular method of concealment because they can, in most circumstances, be worn year-round. Of course I’m sure you’ve heard various tactards suggest that wearing a vest — something like a photographer’s vest — is a dead giveaway that you have a gun on your hip. I’m not convinced of that. In fact, I think the now popular un-tucked shirt might even be more of an indicator. At the same time, the two states I frequent the most — West Virginia and Arizona — both have Constitutional Carry, so even criminals, who are a fry or two short of a Happy Meal, suspect that everyone around them is carrying. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Here’s the thing: A vest adds a bit of flare and character, if not gravitas, to your appearance. Through a vest on over a flannel shirt and you immediately go from a redneck to a renaissance man. I probably have a half-dozen vests I wear depending on the season — and situation — primarily for the purpose of hiding a gun. What I’d been missing was a kind of all-season vest. I found the answer with the "Swift Cover Vest" . Granted, there’s no shortage of cover vests specifically designed for concealed carry on the market. The problem with most is that they are designed to carry and not hide the gun. Stick 20-some ounces inside your vest and it becomes cumbersome and uncomfortable. Related GunDigest Articles 6 Concealed Carry Insurance Options To Protect Your Six (2020) 9 Standout Concealed Carry Revolvers For Personal Defense (2020) What Is The Best Concealed Carry Holster? (2020)

Tactical GadgetsWhere Does It Stop ?

Tactical Gadgets have been all the rage the last few years, but how many of them are useful? In the last few years we have seen a virtual explosion of companies coming on the firearm scene who are pimping the latest gadget to help you shoot better. This recent exponential increase in the gear and accessories market has been spun into a frenzy with the threat of more gun control legislation the last few years. The other part of this phenomenon is that many of these new pieces of gear always seem to be designed by an annoymous “special operations professional”, a term that should always raise a red flag. Maybe I’m just naturally skeptical of anything someone doesn’t put their name on. I mean we aren’t talking about any piece of gear or equipment that would violate operational security (OPSEC/COMSEC) protocols, its just an accessory that is often times part of a monthly “box club” subscription. The problem in 2016 is to figure out how to discern what gear are trinkets and gadgets and what is actually useable to you as a shooter. The first part of that equation is to take an honest look at who you are and how you shoot. If you are a private security professional or some other armed professional like law enforcement etc, your gear will be very different than the casual shooter. There are a lot of people in the world that fancy themselves to be a hi speed low drag gunslinger with plate carriers, helmets and a full load out, who really work in the accounting department. Now there is nothing wrong with being prepared for a SHTF scenario and being able to work in your kit and know how to use every bit of it. I can almost promise that there is a very small percentage of the people who actually own that type of gear, practice and train in it. This is why knowing yourself and being honest with yourself is critical. In the interest of being able to evaluate gear I will admit I have acquired several pieces of gear to test and evaluate that really left me scratching my head as to what the designers were thinking, aside from getting paid crazy amount of money. I have also come across some really well thought out ideas that were amazingly cheap and effective. One of the stranger pieces of gear I have acquired is shown in the above feature image, this little gem is known as the FANG High Speed Shooting Stabilizer. It’s the epitome of gear gadgets that will be snapped up by legions of people who will just “have to have it”. Stop and think about it I mean someone makes a “tactical nut sack” that people actually buy. It’s as genius as the pet rock, totally useless but people buy it and makes the brains behind it rich. Image Courtesy:armoryblog.com THE FUTURE ? I hate to sound pessimistic but I think if I had to predict the future of accessories I would say we haven’t yet seen the worst ideas yet. There are a ton of items that people buy that are just amazingly stupid in my opinion and I’m sure that at SHOT Show 2017 I will see some ideas that are great and some that are clearly designed to separate you from your hard earned money with little to give in return aside from a piece of 3D printed plastic. To keep things interesting we have compiled a quick list in no particular order of tactical gadgets that we here at the site have come to consider fairly useless. We hope you enjoy the list, If you have any suggestions on fads or tactical gadgets that are truly useless, drop us a line and let us know. We are always up for a good laugh. THE LIST Tac-Sac : Tactical Nut Sack (Almost $40 for a ball sack) FANG Shooting Stabilizer ($44 for this thing) Pistol Bayonets Mule-Tac Glock Stock .. LINK HERE Tactical Mug ($139.99 for a MUG … LINK HERE ) Tactical Bacon($25.95 for 9 oz of regular bacon) EOTECH “Biohazard Optic” (Cash in on zombies of course) Ballistic Underware Tactical Lever Action by Mossberg Never Quit Grip by Ergo Grip (If you can’t handle your AR15 move to a .22LR) Image Courtesy:Americanrifleman.com

Summary

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